History Pub

Developed by Holy Names Heritage Center, History Pub is a collaborative program of the Heritage Center, Oregon Historical Society, and McMenamins. Programs feature a presentation by an expert from fields including history, journalism, and women's studies. Whenever possible, individuals who participated in or were affected by the events share their memories as part of the program. The voices of historical participants add a unique perspective to the discussion of these important issues.

History Pub is designed to increase public understanding of historical events that have shaped the past and their continued implications for the present and future. The series explores lesser-known historical events and the important roles minority groups have played in the Northwest and encourages participants to consider the ways social, cultural, and political forces affect individuals, communities and physical places.

The series is held at the historic McMenamins' Kennedy School in northeast Portland. Where else can you hear fascinating history while enjoying a slice of pizza and a frosty pint of handcrafted ale? History Pub appeals to a broad audience and is also family-friendly. This innovative program typically draws a crowd of 150 people each month.

The Martha Washington Hotel: Portland's Early Affordable Housing Endeavor

November 27, 2017 7PM

 Three versions of the Martha Washington Hotel operated between 1887 and 1983.  Though only two were named The Martha Washington, all three were started by The Portland Women’s Union. The first all-women volunteer organization in the state of Oregon, the PWU had a  primary mission to provide a safe and respectable residence for women coming to the city of Portland.  


There were no organized social services to support women in the city at the time, so the Union also established Portland’s first night school, which offered classes in grammar, mathematics, and bookkeeping, and an industrial school, where women could learn gardening, sewing, and housekeeping skills. The PWU hired a “depot matron” to direct young women to “respectable” housing and employment and worked with social agencies to begin the travelers’ aid program.

Enjoy an evening watching a documentary about how the residences for women came to be, and learn from the filmmaker what she learned about the beginning of affordable housing for women in the city of Portland.

 Dana Plautz is a filmmaker with a passion for telling stories about places or industries that no longer exist in their original form.  Her projects include the award-winning documentary Artist Response to 9.11 and The Martha Washington and the Women Who Built Her. Ms. Plautz also produced and researched several of the interactive media installations for the 2006 Portland Armory which underscored the value of architectural preservation to our community.

 

The Beaverton Outlaws

October 30, 2017 7PM

Did you know that you can design, build, license and fly your very own full-scale aircraft? Did you know that Oregon is home to the most successful line of kit-built aircraft in the US? Did you know that without Oregon pilots none of this would be possible? Hear the story of the Beaverton pilots known as the "Beaverton Outlaws," who literally flew in the face of the federall government in the 1930s when home-built aircraft was marked illegal. Mark Baxter and Cassandra Barrong will present a video history of these men, complete with interviews of the outlaws themselves, highlighting what it was like to fly in such a time.The speakers will explore how these men forever changed the face of general aviation as we know it today.

The Legacy of Obo Addy and His Impact in the Pacific Northwest

August 28, 2017 7PM

For decades, the musical traditions of Ghana were explored and extended by Ghana-born and Portland-based drummer, composer, and bandleader Obo Addy. Together with his world beat band, Kukrudu, and traditional quartet, Okropong, Addy was one of Ghana's greatest musical ambassadors. A recipient of the prestigious national Heritage Fellowship Award by the National Endowment for the Arts, Addy toured extensively through the United States, Europe, the Middle East and Australia creating cultural awareness and understanding through the presentation of African music, dance and culture.

Join us for a presentation on Obo Addy's impact on the Pacific Northwest, including a performance by Okropong.

Though he passed away in 2012, Addy's work carries on through the Obo Addy Legacy Project, which includes educational offerings, concerts and performing arts groups that tour the country. Their mission is to preserve and present African music, dance and culture, as well as create new work and collaborate in ways that will strengthen the community. Their overarching goal is to work forward from Obo Addy's vision and ideas and use this as the springboard to new work and new ideas.

The Obo Addy Legacy Project was formed in 1986 under the name "Homowo African Arts and Cultures." Based in Portland, they've produced an African Music and Art Festival for 15 years (the Homowo Festival for African Arts), award winning programs in schools for 28 years, and an African Arts Day Camp for 15 years. They have served over one million people with high quality performances and educational opportunities and are known for their deep commitment to school age children.

Oregon's Edith Green: Champion for Equality

July 31, 2017 7PM

Much of what can be seen today in federal support of education, equal access for women to academic programs and faculties, and the current range of women's athletics -- indeed the expanded role of women in the workplace -- began more than a half century ago with Oregon's Edith Green. In her 20 years in the U.S. House of Representatives, she was the acknowledged leader on landmark education legislation, and before the advent of the Feminist Movement, she also was an early advocate for equal treatment of women in employment and education. Among many other laws, those two interests led to her role in creating what became known as Title IX, which prohibited discrimination against women by educational institutions receiving federal funds and led, among other important impacts, to a revolutionary expansion in women's sports. This talk looks at the notable career and achievements of this pace-setting lawmaker in promoting the causes of education and women's equality in the male-dominated Congress of her time.

Phil Cogswell retired in 1999 after a 32-year career at The Oregonian, including positions as reporter, op-ed page editor and deputy editorial page editor. He worked as a Congressional intern in the office of Rep. Edith Green in the summer of 1963 when she was securing passage of the Higher Education Facilities Act. As The Oregonian's Washington, D.C., correspondent (1972-74) he covered Rep. Green's last three years in Congress.

Bigotry Unmasked: The Rise of the KKK in Southern Oregon

June 26, 2017 7PM

In 1921, Luther Powell, a recruitment officer for the Ku Klux Klan, arrived in southern Oregon to recruit new members for the Klan. His visit marked the beginning of a short, but disturbing, period in Oregon’s history.  Historian Jeff LaLande will speak about the Klan’s influence in southern Oregon during the 1920s, the 1923 Alien Property Act prohibiting immigrants from owning or leasing land, and more about this turbulent time.

Jeff LaLande, a retired U.S. Forest Service archaeologist, has lived in the Rogue Valley for over 45 years. He received a Ph.D. in history from the University of Oregon in 1993. LaLande has taught at Southern Oregon University and is the author of a number of several books and numerous articles.

Portland's Black Belt: Motives and Means in Albina Real Estate, 1940-1990

May 22, 2017 7PM

NOTE: This program is one week early due to Memorial Day!

In 1960, Portland was the second-most segregated city on the West Coast, behind Los Angeles. Four of five Black residents lived in the Albina District. This presentation explores how the real estate industry, public officials, and citizens justified that spatial segregation. It traces the private- and public-sector mechanisms utilized to confine and re-shape Black settlement within Albina. A major motive for segregation was to enable financial exploitation of Black homeowners and renters, allowing housing-industry manipulators to extract wealth from the Black community.

Dr. Karen J. Gibson is an Associate Professor in the Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning at Portland State University. Her scholarship seeks to answer questions about the political economy of racial economic inequality in the urban setting.

Stories of Resistance to Japanese American Incarceration and Discrimination

March 27, 2017 7PM

In recognition of the seventy-fifth anniversary of Franklin Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066, which sent 120,000 Japanese Americans to incarceration camps until after the conclusion of World War II, and the second annual Minoru Yasui Day, this program offers stories of those who stood against the incarceration and the racism faced by many Japanese Americans after the war. George Nakata grew up in Portland’s Nihonmachi and was incarcerated at Minidoka as a child. In his adulthood, Mr. Nakata has become a trusted story-teller, sharing many stories of incarceration from the community. Linda Tamura will highlight some of the Hood River, Oregon, residents who supported their Japanese American neighbors in the face of aggressive discrimination they faced after the war. We will read personal letters and proclamations from Oregonians to Governor Sprague in 1941 and 1942, both advocating for and resisting the exclusion and incarceration of Oregonian Japanese Americans.

On view will be Architecture of Internment: The Buildup to Wartime Incarceration, a traveling exhibit about the role of Oregonians in the decision to incarcerate Japanese Americans during World War II curated by Anne Galisky (Graham Street Productions).

Is Portland Ready for the Big One?Portland's Past and Future Earthquakes

February 27, 2017 7PM

In the Pacific Northwest of the United States, the Juan de Fuca plate is being subducted under the North American Plate at the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The lecture will discuss the hazards of and the preparedness for ground shaking, liquefaction, landslides, and tsunamis along the subduction zone. What are the differences of recurrence intervals for large earthquakes on the northern and southern margins?

Much of the region was not thought to be an earthquake region so earthquake building standards are fairly recent. How does the chance of crustal, plate, and subduction quakes affect building codes, emergency preparedness, siting of critical facilities, building of bridges, and transportation corridors in the region? What have we learned from recent subduction quakes around the world that can be applied to the Pacific Northwest? What can the region expect after a large quake?