Oregon's Edith Green: Champion for Equality

July 31, 2017 7PM

Much of what can be seen today in federal support of education, equal access for women to academic programs and faculties, and the current range of women's athletics -- indeed the expanded role of women in the workplace -- began more than a half century ago with Oregon's Edith Green. In her 20 years in the U.S. House of Representatives, she was the acknowledged leader on landmark education legislation, and before the advent of the Feminist Movement, she also was an early advocate for equal treatment of women in employment and education. Among many other laws, those two interests led to her role in creating what became known as Title IX, which prohibited discrimination against women by educational institutions receiving federal funds and led, among other important impacts, to a revolutionary expansion in women's sports. This talk looks at the notable career and achievements of this pace-setting lawmaker in promoting the causes of education and women's equality in the male-dominated Congress of her time.

Phil Cogswell retired in 1999 after a 32-year career at The Oregonian, including positions as reporter, op-ed page editor and deputy editorial page editor. He worked as a Congressional intern in the office of Rep. Edith Green in the summer of 1963 when she was securing passage of the Higher Education Facilities Act. As The Oregonian's Washington, D.C., correspondent (1972-74) he covered Rep. Green's last three years in Congress.