Harmony and Hysteria: Azalea Peet, Margaret Peppers and the Japanese American Camps of WWII

October 24, 2016 at 7pm (one week earlier than usual!)

United by a common dedication to education and social welfare in the realm of organized religion, Azalea Peet of Gresham and Margaret Peppers of Seattle found their convictions challenged amid the rising tide of anti-Japanese sentiment in the months after Pearl Harbor.

When the House Select Committee Investigating National Defense Migration held its hearings in Portland in February, 1942, Peet was the only person to speak out on moral grounds against the forced removal of west coast Japanese Americans. A few months later, Episcopal Deaconess Margaret Peppers accompanied her incarcerated congregation as it moved from Camp Harmony in the Seattle outskirts to Camp Minidoka in Idaho. Eventually, Azalea Peet lived and served in a farm labor camp populated by Japanese Americans in Nyssa, Oregon, while working there with women and children as part of a federated church ministry. In her own way, each woman demonstrated courage in the face of frequently hostile public opinion.